Annapolis Royal

King’s Theatre

Today's King's Theatre is the beneficiary of over 400 years of live theatre in Nova Scotia. Canada's first play was performed here at Annapolis Royal in 1606. As the bustling seaport town grew, it became a regular stop for traveling troupes and roving thespians, and live theatre thrived. The theatre building itself has a history of gritty survival. The original structure, along with much of the downtown area, was destroyed in the town's "Great Fire" of 1921. The new building on the present site housed a movie theatre until it was abandoned in the late 70's. A newly renovated and revitalized King's Theatre opened its doors again on March 11, 1982, and live theatre came back to town. Possession of the theatre subsequently passed from the town of Annapolis Royal to an independent society of area residents which, together with a board of directors, continues to oversee the operations of the theatre.

The theatre today offers comfortable seating for 220 in an intimate atmosphere with state-of-the-art acoustics. In this setting, the theatre now operates as a non-profit performance arts center to fulfill its mandate of encouraging cultural, artistic, and educational development. King's has established an enduring reputation for eclectic variety in its programming, an approach designed to appeal to the widest possible audience. The result has been a potpourri of outstanding entertainment including musical interpretations of Nova Scotia's Acadian, Celtic and Aboriginal cultures as well as music in the classical, country, folk and world music. In live theatre, King's offers the works of various touring companies and presentations by the local theatrical society. A growing favourite are the 10-minute plays of the annual King's Shorts Festival featuring local and area playwrites, directors, and actors. Dance is always on the program as well as children's theatre, comedy, and an occasional taste of opera. We are also a movie theatre - the only one in the area – with a playbill including late releases plus international films imported by our own Film Society. With performers and shows from the local and international scene, emerging and award-winning artists, we have something for everyone.

Address
King’s Theatre
358 St George Street
Annapolis Royal, NS
(902) 532-7704

www.kingstheatre.ca
Tickets
King's Theatre Box Office - online, in person, or over the phone! (see above)
Venue Chair
Geoff Keymer
gm@kingstheatre.ca

Bayfield

St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church


The Church of St. Mary the Virgin is nestled on the picturesque shores of St. George's Bay. The area is comprised of gently rolling farmlands and sandy beaches. A tragic fire in the late 1890s destroyed the original St. Mary's and the current Church was built in 1902. It is an architectural gem with a wooden interior that provides warmth and intimacy as well as a wonderful acoustic.

Address
St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church
1407 Summerside Road
Bayfield, NS
(902) 863-5089
www.threeharbours.net

Tickets
Lyghtesome Gallery
166 Main Street
Antigonish, NS B2G 2B7
(902) 863-8122
Venue Chair
Jeanine Gunn
(902) 386-2481
jeaninegunn@yahoo.com

Chester

St. Stephen’s Anglican Church

St. Stephen’s Anglican Church was part of the Parish of Lunenburg until 1800. To accommodate a growing congregation, the present church was built in 1840. The new church was consecrated on June 5, 1842 by Bishop John Inglis. The interior of this second building was originally laid out with enclosed pews which were used until 1899. Box pews were then installed and the church has remained substantially the same since that time.

Address
St. Stephen’s Anglican Church
60 Regent Street
Chester, NS B0J 1J0
www.saintstephenschester.ca
Tickets
Pharmasave
3785 Highway 3
Chester, NS B0J 1J0
(902) 275-3518

Chéticamp

Eglise Saint-Pierre

Cheticamp is an Acadian Parish founded in 1785 and entrusted to the Eudist Fathers in 1953. Three churches were successively built, in 1790, 1810, and 1861, about one mile south east of the present one. The current church was constructed in 1893 at the cost of $41,950 by Father Fiset whose tomb may be visited under the Sanctuary. Stones for the construction were hauled on the ice by groups of parishioners from Cheticamp Island across the harbour. The church is 212 feet long, 74 feet wide, and the steeple rises to 167 feet. In 1957 the church was repainted and decorated with frescoes and stained glass windows were added. The organ, one of the first Casavant, was acquired in 1904 and is still in excellent condition. St. Peter's Church is situated on high grounds near the harbour and can be seen from all parts of the Parish, from the mountains and from the sea for many miles around. This imposing monument, with its architecture, its frescoes, and its stained glass windows, is one of the most beautiful churches in the Maritime Provinces. It is also a witness to the deep faith and determination of its parishioners of past and present generations.

Address
Eglise Saint-Pierre
15119 Cabot Trail
Chéticamp, NS
(902) 224-2064
Tickets
Les Trois Pignons Visitor Information Centre
Venue Chair
Paul Gallant
pauldgallant@gmail.com

East River

St. George’s Anglican Church

St. George’s Anglican Church was built at East River Point in 1889, and remains a gem on the shores of Mahone Bay. The land for St. George’s, East River (then known as Indian Point) was deeded to the Lord Bishop of Nova Scotia and his successors by John and Sarah Rost on April 1, 1889. The church was built by a man named Strum of Mader’s Cove. Hand-hewn timbers were donated by Michael Fleet. The foundation was made of hand-split granite blocks, using hand-drills and ‘feathers’. There were many helping hands in this great community effort, and both the oxen and the people worked hard.

The first services were held (as was often the custom in small or new communities) in the old School House on the site of the Village Hall, before the church was built. Most of the cost was met by donated labour and materials, but money was needed too, and was raised in many ways. Old records state, "A picnic was held in the big field, now Mr. Selvyn Cook’s homestead. The men made big tables and benches and box swings. There were races, and games. The ladies cooked and served a big supper. In the evening, there was dancing to fiddle music on an outdoor stage. Mrs. Artemus Cook and Mrs. Henry Melvin made fresh butter, gathered the fresh eggs, packed their baskets full and walked to Mill Cove and vicinity by way of a wooded path to sell the produce and collect contributions of money."

How did St. George’s Church receive its name? As the booklet by Mrs. John Meisner and Mrs. Terry Young says, "At the opening meeting, Rev. [George] Butler having suggested to name the Church St. James for Mr. James Cook, Mr. Cook replied, ‘Oh no, my master, not James for me, but George for you, sir.’ So the little church had a name, St. George’s, for the rector, named by a modest and good-living man in the person of Uncle Jim Cook."

The church bell which is rung every Sunday was cast in 1891 by M.C. Shane Bell Foundry at Baltimore, Maryland, and was used down the years not only to summon the faithful to worship, but also to signal news of deaths in the community and other notable events. The cemetery was first used in 1889, when a 14 year old, named John Roast, was buried on May 2nd. Mr. Joe Countway donated land for a cemetery extension in 1951, and more land was donated by Donald Cooke in 1962. The church steeple was radically changed during the Rectorship of Fr. Bev Strople, from a four-pinnacle style like that of Canterbury Cathedral (and St. Stephen’s, Chester) to a spire and cross. A Vestry was added and later enlarged to house a furnace; “let all the earth keep silence before Him”--indeed, the clergy and people silently sighed because the old furnace housed formerly in the nave (which howled through the services) was silenced forever.

With its tall bell tower, topped by an octagonal ‘witch’s cap’ style roof featuring a large cross finial, the church was used as a landmark both from the road and the ocean for decades. Though still used as a landmark by land, the trees between the church and the ocean have obscured the church’s visibility from the ocean today.

Address
St. George’s Anglican Church
7338 Highway 329
East River, NS B0J
Tickets
Finishing Styles Hair Salon
6 Pig Loop Road, Chester
(902) 275-5966
St. Stephen's Parish Office
54 Regent Street, Chester
(902) ​​275-3804
Venue Chair
Sabine Richter
(902) 670-5773
spr201250@gmail.com

Halifax

Lilian Piercey Concert Hall

The Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts offers an accessible and comprehensive program of dance and music instruction accommodating students of all ages and levels of ability. With its inception in 1887, the Conservatory is the largest, oldest, and most venerable of organizations for education in the performing arts east of Montreal. Its current home, built in 1910 as Halifax's Chebucto Road School, was designated a heritage building because of its role in the aftermath of the Halifax Explosion of 1917. With 39,000 square feet, 9 classrooms and 17 music and dance studios, the building ideally suits the needs of the Conservatory's current and future programs.

Included in the many fine rooms the building offers, is the beautiful Lilian Piercey Concert Hall, one of the finest acoustic halls in Halifax. The high arched ceiling and wall of windows create an elegant space in which to hear its two grand pianos and fine Dowd harpsichord or any other combination of acoustic instruments, orchestras, and ensembles. The gently-sloping carpeted floor leads to a floating hardwood front which doubles as a dance studio and performance stage.

Address
Lilian Piercey Concert Hall
Maritime Conservatory of the Performing Arts
6199 Chebucto Road
Halifax, NS B3L 1K7
(902) 423-6995
www.maritimeconservatory.com
Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x261
Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

Halifax

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

The Maritime Museum of the Atlantic is the oldest and largest Maritime Museum in Canada. The original concept of the Museum can be credited to a group of Royal Canadian Navy officers who envisioned a maritime museum where relics of Canada's naval past could be conserved. Starting with a small space at the Halifax Dockyard in 1948, the museum then moved to quarters in the Halifax Citadel in 1952, and became the Maritime Museum of Canada in 1957. Floods and fires in the early 1960s caused temporary relocations to a variety of sites until 1965, when a home was found in a former bakery building at the Navy's Victualling Depot. The Museum became the Marine History section of the Nova Scotia Museum in 1967. The exhibits remained on Citadel Hill while the offices, library, and some of the collection moved to the new Nova Scotia Museum building on Summer Street in Halifax in 1970. Through the 1970s, a long search for a permanent home ensued. Finally, in 1982, the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic was established on the site of the Robertson & Son Ship Chandlery and A.M. Smith & Co. Properties on the Halifax Waterfront. It opened on January 22 of that year. Since then, more than 4 million people have visited the Museum. The Museum is a valuable historical, cultural and educational institution. It is the largest site in Nova Scotia that collects and interprets various elements of Nova Scotia's marine history. Visitors are introduced to the age of steamships, local small craft, the Royal Canadian and Merchant Navies, World War II convoys and The Battle of the Atlantic, the Halifax Explosion of 1917, and Nova Scotia's role in the aftermath of the Titanic disaster. The Small Craft Gallery is an impressive room with high ceilings to accommodate the masts of our nautical vessels collection and large windows looking out onto the harbour.

Address
Maritime Museum of the Atlantic
1675 Lower Water Street
Halifax, NS B3J 1S3
(902) 424-7490
www.maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca

Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x261
Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

Halifax

St. George’s Anglican Church, ‘The Round Church’

The Parish of Saint George offers a unique combination of traditional Anglican worship and a commitment to Inner-City Ministry and has a fascinating history, expressed in tangible form by the two church buildings that lie within its boundaries, both bearing the name St. George, and both of national significance. The first St. George's, the "Little Dutch [Deutsch] Church," is the second oldest church in Halifax. Originally a small house, it was adapted for its purpose in 1756 and moved to the burying ground in the northern suburb of the German settlers’ community known as the "Foreign Protestants." To meet needs of a growing congregation, and with the support of the British government, the Parish embarked on the construction of a second St. George's in 1800. Its circular Palladian design, like that of Halifax's Town Clock, was a product of the architectural taste of Edward, Duke of Kent, commander of the forces in Nova Scotia and son of George III, who played an active role in the planning of the new building. Originally perfectly round, a porch and chancel were added between 1822-1827, creating a structure which, despite later alterations and additions, closely resembles what visitors see today.

Address
St. George’s Anglican Church, ‘The Round Church’
2222 Brunswick Street
Halifax, NS B3K 2Z2
(902) 423-1059
www.roundchurch.ca
Tickets
King’s Co-op Bookstore
University of King’s College
6350 Coburg Road
Halifax, NS B3H 2A1
(902) 422-1271 x261
Venue Chair
Jolanta Lorenc
(902) 237-8109
jmlorenc@gmail.com

Orangedale

United Church Manse

The Orangedale United Church was established in 1930, becoming an integral part of the community which it continues to do. The church became a member of the River and Lakeside Pastoral Charge in1954. Throughout its history, the church has brought music into the community, from Sunday School programs, putting on concerts with talented local musicians to hosting Celtic Colours Concerts.  The village of Orangedale is a small rural community nestled by the Bras D'or Lakes, in Cape Breton. It is home to the Orangedale Railway Museum which hosts a historic, Victorian style station built by the Intercolonial Railway Company, which gained some fame with the release of The Rankin Family's song "Orangedale Whistle". In recent years, L'Arche Cape Breton has become an important part of the community. Orangedale has and will remain a welcoming community to anyone who comes for a visit or to stay.

Address
United Church Manse
Orangedale Road
Orangedale, NS B0E 2K0
(902) 756-2829
Tickets
(902) 756-2994, (902) 756-2798, or (902) 756-2022
Venue Chair
Mary Ann McFadyen
(902) 756-2994
murandma@gmail.com

Yarmouth

Holy Trinity Anglican Church

Holy Trinity Anglican Church is valued for its role in the Anglican community of Yarmouth, for its historical associations with Rev. Ranna Cossitt, the parish’s first rector, and with Rev. Roy Campbell, designer of the church. It is also valued for its Gothic Revival architecture and stained glass windows.

The first Anglican church in Yarmouth was built around 1793 on Main Street (almost directly west of the site of the present Anglican church). The building served other purposes as well, including as a hospital when an epidemic struck the town. In 1799 it was sold and moved, though a panelled door from the church was removed and is preserved in the present parish hall. For the next several years services were held in the loft of a shed on Baker’s Wharf, the present site of the ferry terminal, where it is said the first communion service was held in 1806. The architect for this building was Rev. J. R. Roy Campbell, who had trained as an architect as well as a priest in England, and was the Curate of Holy Trinity Church. A brochure printed about the church says of him “He was an enthusiast for the neo-gothic movement that parallelled the Oxford Movement in its enthusiasm for the medieval Catholic heritage of Anglicanism.” Rev. Campbell was also the author of an extensive and authoritative history of Yarmouth County, which is still considered among the most reliably factual local histories.

The first sod for this present Gothic Revival style structure was turned in 1866, the ground excavated in 1867, cornerstone laid on August 20, 1868, the walls built in 1869, and the tower and spire completed in 1870. The building was consecrated on August 4, 1872 with a congregation of more than 800 present. The church is constructed of brick with New Brunswick freestone trim in the cruciform plan, and heavily buttressed. The many beautiful stained-glass windows are also noteworthy, most of them having been funded by individuals or family groups of the parish in memory of deceased family members.

Address
Holy Trinity Anglican Church
63 William Street
Yarmouth, NS B5A 3A6
(902) 742-3181
Tickets
(902) 742-8765
Venue Chair
Joan Semple
(902) 742-8765
joan.semple@hotmail.com